Posts tagged “#motionpicture

Revisiting “Heaven’s Gate” (1980)

The legendarily troubled production Heaven’s Gate (1980), which Vilmos Zsigmond shot for director Michael Cimino (The Deer Hunter), has recently garnered a sort of prominence it never achieved in its time, but one that critics agree is well deserved. Undergoing digital restoration and a re-edit for release by the Criterion CollectionHeaven’s Gate played at this year’s Venice Film Festival to great acclaim. In an interview with New York Times reporter Dennis Lim, Cimino expressed that among his favorite things about the picture are “the light and color of the images” that Zsigmond captured.

Heaven’s Gate, 1980

Heaven’s Gate, coming soon from the Criterion Collection: http://www.criterion.com/films/28036-heaven-s-gate
Dennis Lim for the New York Timeshttp://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/08/31/venice-film-festival-michael-cimino-revisits-heavens-gate/
Skylar Browning for the Missoula Independenthttp://missoulanews.bigskypress.com/missoula/out-of-purgatory/Content?oid=1677818


The Incredibly Strange Creatures Who Stopped Living and Became Mixed-Up Zombies!! (1964)

Although it may have alluded some of their biographies and CVs, László Kovács and Vilmos Zsigmond worked together on The Incredibly Strange Creatures Who Stopped Living and Became Mixed-Up Zombies, a campy zombie musical shot on location in Long Beach’s Pike Amusement Park. The two cinematographers may not have been proud of this film, which was has been dubbed the “worst movie ever made,” but the whole genre of camp horror has since garnered a cult following and a recent resurgence in film and television. This renaissance does not come without due credit being given to these two pioneers, who started their Hollywood careers by filming such exploitation movies after emigrating to the U.S. in the late 1950s.

“The Incredibly Strange Creatures Who Stopped Living and Became Mixed-Up Zombies,” 1964

Thanks to Tim Grobaty of the Long Beach Press-Telegram for digging up this gem: http://www.presstelegram.com/ci_21420323/tim-grobaty-long-beachs-role-zombie-apocalypse


Paradise Alley (1978), dir. Sylvester Stallone

Laszlo_Kovacs_Paradise_Alley

Coming off the success of Rocky (1976), Universal Pictures green-lighted Sylvester Stallone‘s Paradise Alley, a wrestling picture that the young actor wrote, directed, and stared in. László Kovács was behind the camera, capturing the Noir atmosphere of the New York’s seedy boxing parlors of the 1940s. It was pictures like this that led the films that Kovács and Szigmond shot to be labelled “American New Wave.”


Targets (1968), dir. Peter Bogdanovich

Targets, 1968

László Kovács first worked with Peter Bogdanovich, for whom he would photograph six full-length motion pictures, on the director’s first feature, Targets (1968). The film, which had a storied production, was produced by Roger Corman and starred Boris Karloff. Bogdanovich recognized Kovács’ talent at that time and employed the cinematographer consistently for the next decade.